Monday, January 19, 2015

Boston University Terriers (1984-87)


I've been looking for an excuse to run this picture for a while.
The back cover of the 1986 Maine media guide shows the nine Yankee Conference helmets, including newcomers Delaware, Richmond and Villanova. The BU helmet is at center.
Whatever happened to the Bean Pot trophy?

This week, we'll descend into the college football graveyard and look at some more uniforms from three gone-but-not-forgotten programs. Up first, the Boston University Terriers.

In 1984, BU dumped a cheesy-looking "Boston" wordmark from the helmets and replaced it with the terrier profile logo, which was also the school's general athletics logo and the BU symbol I remember most growing up. (The current cartoony "angry terrier" logo for its sports teams has been used in one form or another since the mid-90s.) The white racing stripes almost, but not quite, wrap around the back of the helmet. The simple shirts and pants from the previous couple seasons remained.

I don't have many photos of BU from the mid-1980s, but here are the Terriers
against two of New England's top running backs from the decade. UNH's Andre Garron,
shown above, is still on the Wildcats' top-10 career rushing list.
From the 1985 Granite yearbook.

Here's BU against Holy Cross' Gil Fenerty (4), still
the Crusaders' all-time leading rusher.
From the Crusader newspaper in '85.

The '84 Terriers, BTW, shared the Yankee Conference title with Rhode Island and reached the NCAA Division I-AA (FCS) Tournament.




In '86, BU kept the helmets, but wore ultra-simple shirts and pants that almost looked like practice uniforms (not the last time that happened with the Terriers). The entire uniform, including the helmet, was overhauled in '88, but the Terrier profile was back on the helmet by '90.

Another photo in which BU is the victim, but it's the best picture I have of the 1986-87 uniform.
This comes from the back cover of the 1987 Maine media guide.

Later this week, we'll stay in the '80s with the Northeastern Huskies.





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